us-flag-crinkled

Don’t become Distracted, this Election is All About Saving America

Don’t let media distractions cause you to miss your blessing – being an American citizen.

I recently had a conversation with a good friend about the presidential election. He repeated the often heard term of voting for the lesser of two evils. The idea is which is better, Hillary the known evil, or Trump an unknown. My take is that Americans must vote for America and the candidate who best can turn our nation around.

The media wants voters to focus on the unimportant rather than what is truly important, saving America from the elitist class that seeks power at the expense of ordinary citizens.

the-way-back-to-restoring-america-book-coverFrank Buckley, author of The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America in a speech given at Hillsdale college on July 11,2016 titled “Restoring America’s Economic Mobility” said:

In the Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels wrote that “the history of all hitherto existing societies is the history of class struggles.” Today the story of American politics is the story of class struggles. It wasn’t supposed to be that way. We didn’t think we were divided into different classes. Neither did Marx.

America was an exception to Marx’s theory of social progress. By that theory, societies were supposed to move from feudalism to capitalism to communism. But the America of the 1850s, the most capitalist society around, was not turning communist. Marx had an explanation for that. “True enough, the classes already exist,” he wrote of the United States, but they “are in constant flux and reflux, constantly changing their elements and yielding them up to one another.”

In other words, when you have economic and social mobility, you don’t go communist. [Emphasis added]

Stop economic and social mobility and you kill America.

Buckley warned, “That is the country in which some imagine we still live, Horatio Alger’s America—a country defined by the promise that whoever you are, you have the same chance as anyone else to rise, with pluck, industry, and talent. But they imagine wrong. The U.S. today lags behind many of its First World rivals in terms of mobility.”

In his column “Aborting the Trump Revolution” Patrick J. Buchanan notes:

Five weeks before Election Day, Trump’s taxes have displaced the former Miss Universe as the critical issue, as determined by the anti-Trump media.

Their motivation is not difficult to discern. Their goals are two. First, make Trump unacceptable as an agent of change. Second, keep the people distracted from their determination to rid America of the incompetent and corrupt ruling class that controls this capital city.

Consider but a few of the disasters that establishment does not want discussed or debated, or the American people thinking about, when they head for the polls in November.

There is the great betrayal of the American working class, the deindustrialization of the country, and the loss of economic independence it took America a century to achieve.

Buckley echoes Buchanan’s “great betrayal of the American working class”, stating:

A complacent Republican establishment denies this change has occurred. If they don’t get it, however, American voters do. For the first time, Americans don’t believe their children will be as well off as they have been. They see an economy that’s stalled, one in which jobs are moving offshore. In the first decade of this century, U.S. multinationals shed 2.9 million U.S. jobs while increasing employment overseas by 2.4 million. General Electric provides a striking example. Jeffrey Immelt became the company’s CEO in 2001, with a mission to advance stock price. He did this in part by reducing GE’s U.S. workforce by 34,000 jobs. During the same period, the company added 25,000 jobs overseas.

Buckley concludes, “Since 2012, establishment Republicans have continued to be less than concerned for the plight of ordinary Americans… There are even the ‘conservative’ pundits who offer the pious hope that drug-addicted Trump supporters will hurry up and die. That’s one way to ameliorate the class struggle, but it doesn’t exactly endear anyone to the establishment.”

Buckley drives home his point with, “[T]he principles held up as sacrosanct by establishment Republicans might be logically unassailable, derived like theorems from a set of axioms based on a pure theory of natural rights. But if I don’t see them making people better off, I say to Hell with them. What the establishment Republicans should ask themselves is Anton Chigurh’s question in No Country for Old Men: If you followed your principles, and your principles brought you to this, what good are your principles?”

To hell with them!

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *