electoral-college

The Brilliance of the Electoral College

As it appears that for the second time this century the United States will elect a president who did not win the popular vote, there are the predictable calls for killing the Electoral College. The same thing occurred in 2000 when Al Gore won the popular vote but George W. Bush won the presidency. In fact, this is the fifth time in U.S. history this has occurred.

But as is often the case, the knee-jerk response overlooks well-designed reasoning. In many ways the Electoral College is yet another example of the brilliance of the Founders and Framers of the Constitution.

They purposely avoided a pure democracy majority rule form of governing at every turn. The reason is simple. Pure democracies do not work. Straight majority-rule democracy is sometimes compared to two wolves and a sheep voting on what’s for dinner. That old saw depicts how a simple majority can tyrannize the minority — and inevitably will.

This is human nature. Mankind could never be expected to act selflessly and self-sacrificially for the greater good, so the Founders built in a tension between the three branches of government that harnessed basic human nature to keep government in check. They believed only a self-checking and self-limiting system could keep the tyranny of human nature at bay. And they actually used human nature to accomplish it.

They employed the same thinking for how we elect our government leaders through a process that ensured presidential candidates had to run in all the country, not just the population centers. This was to make sure that a diverse and growing nation would get representation from all sectors and that a President would have to campaign in all regions and demographics.

Here’s how it works

The president and vice president are not elected by popular vote, but by 538 electors — which is essentially the sum total of the House of Representatives, Congress and the District of Columbia. So there is population representation through the number of congressional districts, and state representation through number of Senate seats. This is the math for spreading out the Electoral College.

So when we vote for president and fill in the oval for our candidate, we are actually voting for the slate of electors in our state, who will then officially vote in December for president. If the Democrat wins, the Democratic electors will vote. If the Republican wins, the Republican electors will vote.

This is why 270 is magical number to win the presidency. It is 50 percent plus one of these electors.

With a straight popular vote, presidential candidates would only campaign in the major population centers along the coasts and some big cities inland. Regions such as the upper Midwest and rural South and western mountains would rarely if ever see a candidate. And worse, presidents would then feel free to ignore the interests of people in those regions. Need to dump toxic waste? North Dakota it is!

But with the Electoral College as the method, North Dakota’s three electors just might matter.

In this system, presidential candidates need to build coalitions and campaign nationally. A regional candidate cannot win nationally. A candidate with a narrow base cannot win nationally.

This creates the phenomenon of swing states, which get a hyper-media focus every four years. But those are not in granite. In fact they change all the time. Florida may well be the longest term swing state going forward because of our in-migration patterns from around the nation. But remember, until 1988, California was a reliably Republican state. Kind of astonishing to think about now. And Texas was as solid blue as the came. Virginia and North Carolina were part of the Democrat South, then became part of the Republican South and now are kind of swingy.

What this means, and this is just brilliant, is that no major party can ignore any state for too long without suffering. Even small states. Remember 2000? George W. Bush won that, hanging chads and all, because of Florida, right? Well, yes. But what is forgotten is that Florida would not have mattered if Democrats had not taken West Virginia for granted. It was a solid blue state, they ignored it, and Bush flipped it. That is what made Florida and its huge electoral count relevant. Yet West Virginia only has four electoral votes.

That is the genius of the Electoral College, forcing presidents to create coalitions, campaign nationally and represent even thinly populated areas. Another grand slam by the Framers that is still working.

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared on TheRevolutionaryAct.com.

4 replies
  1. Trevor Colestock
    Trevor Colestock says:

    I disagree with the premise that major population centers would rule the roost.

    As of now, if you are a Republican in California or a Democrat in Texas, turnout maybe depressed per one party dominance, whereas in Florida, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, the battleground states created by the Electoral College, have a clear and motivated reason to vote.

    Without the Electoral College, Republicans in solid blue states and Democrats in solid red states suddenly have motivation to vote and it will truly be a “one person, one vote” concept.

    Besides, Donald Trump called for the abolishment of the Electoral College in a tweet in 2012: https://twitter.com/realdonaldtrump/status/266038556504494082?refsrc=email&s=11

    Newt Gingrich expressed support for the National Popular Vote compact two years ago:

    http://www.nationalpopularvote.com/newt-gingrich-endorses-national-popular-vote

    It will be interesting to see if Trump or Gingrich will change their tune on the Electoral College as they have now benefitted from it.

    Reply
  2. Trevor Colestock
    Trevor Colestock says:

    Nice to know my comment was deleted, I guess like Crooked Hillary we do censorship now when someone posts a contrary view. Sorry you cannot handle fact and academic discourse. Nice knowing you!

    Reply
    • Dr. Rich Swier
      Dr. Rich Swier says:

      That is true, until Republicans abolished slavery.

      1865: December: US abolishes slavery with the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution; about 40,000 remaining slaves are affected. 1866: Slavery abolished in Indian Territory

      Reply

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