EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Debating Porn With Brandi Love And Terry Schilling — How Do We Protect Children From Accessing Adult Content?

The Daily Caller sat down with adult film star Brandi Love and executive director of American Principles Project Terry Schilling to debate all things porn.

In this episode, Love and Schilling were first asked to swap sides. Schilling pondered what his biggest pro-porn argument would be while Love described an anti-porn viewpoint.

Next, the two took on one of the more prominent issues that has come up regarding porn – in an age where so much is accessible with the touch of a button, what are some potential solutions that would prevent minors from accessing pornography?

WATCH:

Both agreed on the importance of regulating the ability of minors viewing this content, but had different ideas on how to police.

Schilling brought up a solution that his organization has already proposed. In his eyes, reforming Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act would be a good step in making it more difficult for those underage to see this content.

Schilling noted that Section 230 has “been debated with social media platforms.”

“What you would do is, you would give Section 230 immunity to adult websites based on whether or not they have age verification,” he explained. “And if those websites don’t have age verification, then they lose the Section 230 immunity, which would open them up to civil litigation, basically making them liable for any content posted illegally or inappropriately.”

“It would basically force a lot of the adult entertainment companies that are online to do some type of meaningful age verification.”

Love offered a different solution. She argued for a digital ID, although Love noted that she understood Schilling’s argument for reforming Section 230.

“The problems that I see with 230 is that as it’s currently written, it is working,” Love responded. “I feel like the responsibility doesn’t need to be on the free market, on the companies that create the platforms, the user-uploaded content sites.”

“I feel the responsibility needs to be on the person uploading the content. By putting the responsibility and opening up companies to sue-happy people or potentially people that want to abolish a particular aspect of the industry, meaning adult, that leaves these companies wide open … By having a digital ID, which is no different than having a driver’s license … this would be attached to your age, your name, all of your information.”

Love and Schilling continued to discuss each other’s pitches, with Schilling noting that “verified third-party actors” would need to “verify the information and then relay it to the sites.” He expressed concern about the possibility of the federal government getting involved regarding digital ID’s.

“If we can make something happen, not just talk about it but create a solution that solves all these problems,” Love said. “And it’s not about applying it to the adult industry … It’s maintaining and preserving the free and fair market, but also applying equal application of the laws that we’re able to set in, so that there’s not that one ‘target.’”

Stay tuned for more content from Schilling and Love’s porn debate.

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1 reply
  1. Bob
    Bob says:

    The government can censor anything relating to “conspiracy theories” or cures for a virus but can’t get rid of child porn. The reason? Higher ups are implicated in it. It can easily remove it entirely from the Internet and make society a better place. But people will argue saying that the crooks will move somewhere else.

    Reply

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