Media Accuses Indians of Racism for Opposing Black Lives Matter

A prolonged American Prospect whine about GOP community outreach centers in minority communities, especially the Lumbee tribe in North Carolina, includes this contrast.

 The ad recounted the 1958 Battle of Hayes Pond, where a Lumbee contingent of 400 chased off a Ku Klux Klan rally…

In June 2020, a small Black Lives Matter protest took to the streets, beginning from the UNC Pembroke campus. Estimates put the march’s attendance at around 150 people, demonstrating, as thousands of American towns did, against police violence. The march didn’t get far before it was set upon by an armed and agitated Lumbee counterprotest, 300 strong, “probably more than that,” said the Rev. Tyrone Watson, president of the Robeson NAACP, who was among the demonstrators. “They had automatic rifles and handguns. It was something that you would see in the ’50s.” In a cruel inversion of the Battle of Hayes Pond, the protesters were pelted with bottles and rocks, menaced with knives and guns by Native counterprotesters beneath a large Trump flag.

It’s not an inversion, but a repetition.

When the Lumbees fought off white supremacists, they were cheered, but when they fight off black supremacists, suddenly they’re the bad guys.

Tyrone Watson tries to depict an Indian tribe defending itself against black supremacists as somehow comparable to Bull Connor. But that’s how supremacists think.

The encounter led to a series of angry media attacks like this one.

Reckoning With Anti-Blackness in Indian Country – The New Republic

Won’t someone those Indians to kneel when a black supremacist marches by.

The Lumbees were cheered for opposing one set of racists, but jeered for opposing another bunch of racists whose supremacism and bigotry are in vogue.  And the Indians are being compared to the KKK.

As the protesters approached a shopping plaza anchored by a Maxway discount store, they were outnumbered by counter-protesters. A crowd of mostly Native Americans threw whatever they had on hand. One man had a knife, and another carried a military-style rifle slung over his shoulder. A large flag in support of then-President Donald Trump flew from the back of a pickup truck.

Watson, 52, immediately thought of the Ku Klux Klan.

“Instead of KKK signs,” he said, “they were Trump signs.”

When you hate everyone, maybe you’re the problem.

Watson… has navigated a world where he says black people endure racism from two fronts: the whites and the Indians.

If you’re Indian and vote Republican, the media and its black supremacist allies will call you the new KKK.

AUTHOR

EDITORS NOTE: This Jihad Watch column is republished with permission. All rights reserved.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.