Florida Dems: Steal Going Strong?

There are plenty of threats to democracy, but what happens in the voting booth shouldn’t be one of them! Tell that to the people of Florida. Days after the media called the Senate and governor’s races for Rick Scott (R) and Ron DeSantis (R), election officials have suddenly “found” tens of thousands of Democratic votes. And we’re concerned about other governments meddling in our elections?

Unfortunately for Republicans, this isn’t the first time Broward and Palm Beach Counties have been caught cheating the system. More people have been burned by voter fraud on the west side of Florida than the sunshine. Brenda Snipes, the head of Broward County’s election board (and a registered Democrat), could have faced five years in jail for tampering with votes two years ago. Now, Snipes is back to her dirty tricks, telling reporters she has no idea how many ballots are left to count in a race for governor that the Democrat already conceded.

In testy exchanges with reporters, Snipes was visibly upset when Local 10 News asked why two days had gone by and she still didn’t have a final count. “But, Dr. Snipes, it’s now Thursday. We’re still counting ballots in Broward County.” “We’re counting five pages or six pages for each of the people who voted,” Snipes fired back. “But other counties have been able to do it,” he replied. “Other counties didn’t have 600,000 votes out there,” she argued. “Well, Miami-Dade did,” the reporter said simply. “Don’t try to turn this around [on me],” Snipes said and stormed off.

But people who know Snipes’s history say it is on her. In 2016, a judge found her guilty of destroying ballots from a primary in the middle of a lawsuit. In August, she was charged with “improperly handling mail-in ballots,” opening them in secret. Even fellow Democrats, Governor Rick Scott (R) reminds everyone, accused her of “individual and systematic breakdowns” in 2014. Tim Canova, one of the victims of her political sabotage, said, “We’re dealing with organized crime. I don’t trust anything that comes out of this office…”

Neither does Florida Senator Marco Rubio (R), who blasted the counties’ leadership for trying to steal the election. Bay County, he points out on Twitter, “was hit by a Cat 4 Hurricane just four weeks ago, yet managed to count votes and submit timely results. But over 41 hours after polls closed Broward elections office is still counting votes?” Pictures snapped by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel show stacks of ballots that supposedly still haven’t been counted. “A U.S. Senate seat and a statewide Cabinet officer are now potentially in the hands of an elections supervisor with a history of incompetence and blatant violations of state and federal election laws.”

Then there are the other inconsistencies: a passerby allegedly sees ballots being transported in private vehicles and transferred to rent truck on Election night and posts the video “This violates all chain of custody requirements for paper ballots,” Rubio fumed. “Were the ballots destroyed and replaced by a set of fake ballots? Investigate now!” At Miramar Elementary School, a teacher stumbled on an entire box labeled “Provisional ballots” left behind on Tuesday. Republicans in Palm Beach complained that they weren’t allowed to monitor the county’s handling of damaged absentee ballots, which is a serious violation of protocol. And it gets even fishier in Minnesota, where a woman who hadn’t lived in Florida for five years says she got a Florida ballot in the mail.

Governor Scott, whose race for Senate against Bill Nelson (D) had been called by all of the major news networks, now seems headed for a recount, thanks to the magical appearance of 42,000 Democratic ballots. How unusual is that? Well, according to the Florida Department of State, there hasn’t been a recount for governor or senator in state history. And now, suddenly, there are two in one year?

“Late Tuesday night, our win was projected to be around 57,000 votes,” Scott told reporters yesterday. “By Wednesday morning, that lead dropped to 38,000. By Wednesday evening, it was around 30,000. This morning, it was around 21,000. Now, it is 15,000.” Scott, who filed a lawsuit and launched a state investigation, told Fox News’s Sean Hannity, “We don’t know how many votes they’re gonna come up with. But it appears they’re going to try to come up with as many votes as it takes to win this election…” But, he promised, “We’re gonna fight this… No ragtag group of liberal activists or lawyers from D.C. will be allowed to steal this election from the voters in the state of Florida.”

After the antics and outright lies we’ve seen from the Left this year’s, no one can be surprised at how low they will stoop to get their hands on more political power. But this isn’t just about 2018. It’s about 2020, 2022, and every election that comes after. Democrats, Republicans, Independents — we all have a stake in making the democratic system an honest one.


Tony Perkins’ Washington Update is written with the aid of FRC senior writers.


RELATED ARTICLES:

Yes, Democrats Are Trying To Steal The Election In Florida

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Broward County Is An Embarrassment, And The Potential For A Stolen Florida Election Is Real

Florida Vote Scandal Coverage Shows Media-Democrat Complicity. Again.

A Washington Post Mortem on SPLC

Voters Recoil at House Gun Agenda

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission.

When Corporations Ask You to Vote, Whose Values Are They Promoting?

Last month, Levi’s urged Americans to vote. 2ndVote noticed that their ostensibly neutral ad came just weeks after they put one million dollars into a gun control campaign.

They are one of four companies we want you to know are trying to influence your votes today. Levi’sLyftPatagonia, and Walmart are using their corporate power to put politicians who oppose your values into office.

Patagonia

Patagonia’s endorsement of two liberal Democrats is important for two reasons. First, the company clearly is serious about its environmental values — even though cap-and-trade would devastate the U.S. economy and the Paris climate deal was a bad joke. Second, Patagonia is a direct funder of Planned Parenthood. As we noted late last year:

On his way out the door in early 2017, then President Obama issued an executive order designating the Bears Ears National Monument over objections by the Utah government and congressional delegation. Obama’s order also designated the Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada. The designation, which was essentially a land-grab by the federal government, severely restricts recreational and economic use of the land, such as livestock grazing and timber harvesting.

After President Donald Trump partially reversed course, Patagonia’s founder said he would not “let evil win.” This despite sending tens of thousands of dollars to Planned Parenthood!

Walmart, Lyft, & Levi’s

As mentioned above, Levi’s has urged people to vote with its ad — which, we admit, is pretty slick. However, slickness doesn’t dodge the fact that Levi’s is clearly pushing liberal values. The same is true for Walmart and Lyft, which The New York Times highlighted last month for working with Patagonia and Levi’s (among many other less-political companies) on getting out the vote:

Patagonia, for example, is currently suing Mr. Trump for his decision to shrink the size of several national monuments. Walmart’s chief executive, Doug McMillon, chastised Mr. Trump after Charlottesville. And Lyft made a symbolic $1 million donation to the American Civil Liberties Union after Mr. Trump announced his initial travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries last year.

Patagonia is shutting its corporate campus and its retail stores in the United States for the entire day. Levi’s is giving corporate employees five hours to vote on Election Day, and retail employees will get three hours. Walmart created a website with resources to help people get informed and to the polls.

And Lyft is providing discounted rides to polling places, and will provide free rides to people in underserved communities, which it is identifying with help from nonprofit organizations including Voto Latino and affiliates of the Urban League.

Here’s the thing: go and vote. Please. All Americans who can legally vote ought to do so, especially if they are educated on what direction in which they want America to go. It is good that employers are letting their employees off of work to vote.

But let’s be real about what these companies want. Lyft is working with the Urban League, organization that support same-sex marriage and sanctuary city policies and opposes the right to self-defense. And Lyft’s donation to the ACLU is hardly “symbolic,” given that the ACLU has declared virtual war on the Trump administration.

So there we are. Please stop reading and go vote. The nation needs your 2ndVote values to influence your first vote.


Help us continue providing resources like this and educating conservative shoppers by becoming a 2ndVote Member today!


EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission. The featured photo is from Shutterstock.

CNN’S Jim Acosta Butts Heads With The President

After clashing with President Trump during a presidential press conference at the White House Wednesday (Nov 7th), CNN’s Jim Acosta had his press pass suspended “until further notice,” thereby sparking a long standing feud between the President and the main stream media.

The meeting was intended to give the President an opportunity to review Tuesday’s election. He said he was satisfied with the results and hoped to forge a relationship with House Democrats to work on legislation. He then opened the floor for questions from the press.

Acosta was the second person to ask the President a question, involving “the caravan” moving through Mexico to the United States. Here, he challenged the President’s interpretation of “invasion” of the immigrants. The President answered by disagreeing with the reporter’s interpretation. Acosta claimed the President was trying to demonize immigrants by his description which drew the ire of the President who told the reporter to let him do his job. He then turned to another reporter for the next question. Acosta pressed on by beginning to ask a second question regarding the Russian investigation. The President took Acosta to task saying, “I tell you what, CNN should be ashamed of itself having you work for them. The way you treat Sarah Huckabee (Sanders) is horrible. And the way you treat other people is horrible. You shouldn’t treat people that way.”

As I traveled with the press corps in covering Trump Rallies in Florida, I have had the opportunity to watch Acosta work first-hand. It seems to me, he is more interested in his own personal agenda than anything else. He relishes being the center of attention which is why, I believe, he asks questions unlike other reporters. This confrontation with the President is not the first as he has cultivated a combative relationship with Mr. Trump.

Let us not forget, after a confrontation with Trump supporters at a rally in Tampa earlier this year, where he was shouted down by the audience, Acosta said he felt threatened and suggested children shouldn’t be allowed to attend Trump rallies, as the people are allegedly dangerous. This is what initiated his claim that the President was at war with the press.

CNN naturally came to their employee’s defense following Wednesday’s controversy by stating, “This unprecedented decision is a threat to our democracy and the country deserves better. Jim Acosta has our full support.”

They also called Trump’s attacks on the media as “un-American,” thereby fueling the fire of division.

A couple things come to mind after watching this on television. First, I didn’t hear one intelligent question to the President from an American “journalist.” Here you have the Commander-in-Chief where you can ask a question of substance regarding government policies on such things as the economy, trade, foreign relations, health care, prescription drugs (which the President is discussing with Democrats), the federal bench, military matters, immigration reform, etc. Instead, they are preoccupied baiting the President with trivialities designed to make him look bad, not good. He, of course, would have none of it, and snapped back at the questioners now and then. I found it particularly amusing when he said, “That’s the best you’ve got?” or “That’s a question?”

In other words, the President completely understands the game the press is playing with him and is appalled by the low IQ questions and inflammatory accusations they make. This has forced him to become even more no-nonsense than before, which is why he butted heads with Acosta. Frankly, I’m surprised he hadn’t taken them all to task earlier. I suspect we will continue to see more changes in the relationship with the press following the election.

This brings up my second point, participation as a member of the press at the White House is a privilege, not a right. There is no legislation stating the press has access rights. As I’ve mentioned before, it was around President Theodore Roosevelt’s time when the administration allowed members of the press on the grounds of the White House. The press has as much right to the White House, as they do to the President’s taxes, which is zilch.

So, as a guest, the press should behave with more civility at the President’s home, as opposed to becoming obnoxious. In a way this reminds of when you have a guest at your house who perhaps has had too much to drink or has offended someone. Usually, the host asks him to leave and calls him a cab. Jim Acosta’s taxi arrived yesterday.

Keep the Faith!

EDITORS NOTE: All trademarks both marked and unmarked belong to their respective companies.

Governor Scott Sues Broward County Over Election Fraud

Earlier today, The Federalist Pages reported its prediction that Governor Rick Scott, despite the votes still remaining to be counted, would win Florida’s senatorial race against incumbent Senator Bill Nelson, by a razor-thin margin of less than 0.25%.  That was based, among other factors, on an estimated number of about 30,111 early votes in Broward County that had yet to be counted.  This number of outstanding early ballots was based on the reported difference between the counted 665,688 ballots and the 695,799 turned in ballots in Broward.

Now, Fox News is reporting Broward County was claiming there were 707,223 ballots cast on Election Day, and that the number had subsequently increased to 712,840 ballots.  Interestingly, as of this writing at 2235 on November 8, 2018, the Florida Division of Elections is showing 680,568 ballots cast in Broward County.

In the meantime, in Palm Beach County, where The Federalist Pages was unable to determine how many ballots had been cast and were outstanding, Fox is reporting that 15,000 new ballots have appeared.  This while in the remaining 65 other Florida counties, the only ballots remaining to be counted, as required by law, are the military mail-in ballots and the provisional votes.

In the meantime, the election indiscretions have already flipped the Agricultural Commissions race from Republican to Democrat.

Since the publication of The Federalist Pages‘ prediction, Senator Marco Rubio took to Twitter to call attention to the possibility of voter tampering in Broward County.  His series of tweets include an explanation of applicable Florida elections law and images of boxes full of ballots being unloaded in Broward County.  If correct, such an act would be a violation of Florida elections laws.

In the meantime, a Democrat funded team of attorneys has arrived in Florida with the stated intent of “winning the election.”  And in another, late-breaking development, Governor Scott has filed suit against the Broward County Supervisor of Elections, Dr. Brenda C. Snipes, alleging noncompliance by the Supervisor of Elections with Florida’s Public Records Act by not allowing the inspection of the ballots.  The allegations are part of what appears to be a broader array of inconsistencies in vote counting.  For example, mail-in ballots and early votes are supposed to be counted on the day prior to the election so that they may be recorded within 30 minutes after the polls close.  Two days later, neither Broward nor Palm Beach Counties have complied. Additionally, in erroneously filled or damaged ballots, it falls upon the county canvassing board to determine the voter intent, if possible, and to fill in a substitute ballot under public scrutiny. There are allegations made that the Broward County Supervisor of Elections Office is undertaking that process at this time behind closed doors.

It is interesting to note that Broward is the same county that encountered such difficulties in the 2000 presidential election. Also of significance is Dr. Snipe’s history of election indiscretions as determined by a judgment against her for having destroyed ballots in the 2016 congressional race.

Although nothing is known for certain relating to the Broward County Election results, this is going to be a long process for the State of Florida.

RELATED VIDEO: Rick Scott press conference regarding ‘rampant fraud’ in Senate election process.

RELATED ARTICLES:

What The Hell? Broward And Palm Beach Counties Ignore Court Ruling On Vote Counts; UPDATE: Reporters Threatened?

Accusations fly over Broward County ballot shenanigans: Mystery truck deliveries, slow counting and more

Caught On Video: Crews Violating ‘all chain of custody requirements for ballots’

Judge Rules in Governor Scott’s favor in Broward Election Records Request

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared in The Federalist Pages. The featured photo is by Element5 Digital on Unsplash.

VIDEO: Senator Marco Rubio’s comments on Florida Election Recount [English and Español]

Below is new video of Senator Rubio commenting on what’s happening in Broward County following the Florida elections.


Marco Rubio English from Mo Moghari on Vimeo.

A continuación está un nuevo video del Senador Rubio comentando lo sucedido en el Condado de Broward tras las elecciones en la Florida.


Marco Rubio Spanish from Mo Moghari on Vimeo.

RELATED ARTICLES:

GOP Senate candidate Rick Scott files bombshell lawsuits accusing Dem Florida election officials of trying to ‘steal the election’

Woman Overseeing Broward Vote Count Illegally Destroyed Ballots in Previous Race

Messaging App Poll Offers Details on the Youth Vote in 2018 Midterms

NEW YORKNov. 8, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Mei App Inc. today released details of its pre-election and exit poll results for the 2018 Midterm Senate and Governor races. The company conducted polls through its mobile messaging app, Mei.  Approximately 5,000 pre-election polls were answered (out of ~10,000 sent) from October 26 to November 7.  Approximately 2,800 exit polls were answered (out of ~5,500 sent) after elections closed on November 6.

Responses from young voters (age 18 – 29) represented roughly three quarters of poll responses, providing a unique perspective on how the youth vote contributed to the outcome of many elections across the country.  Mei founder, Es Lee, commented, “Understanding young voters, who have typically been underrepresented in other polls and at voting booths, will become increasing important as this group become a larger part of the electorate.”

Pre-Election Poll

The following table summarizes pre-election voting preferences by age group in several hotly contested races.  The percentages indicate the % of planned votes in favor of the Democratic candidate (out of combined planned votes for the Republican and Democratic candidates).  As expected, the predominantly younger polling sample showed a significant preference towards Democratic candidates.  However, how much young voters lean varied by race/candidate.

PRE-ELECTION POLL

AGE GROUP

Election

OVERALL

18-21

22-25

26-29

30-34

35-39

40+

TX Gov. (Valdez v. Abbott)

50%

47%

50%

56%

63%

44%

25%

FL Gov. (Gillum v. Desantis)

65%

50%

82%

88%

67%

56%

64%

GA Gov. (Abrams v. Kemp)

73%

69%

89%

88%

50%

100%

67%

OH Gov. (Cordray v. DeWine)

64%

75%

63%

50%

50%

nm

75%

TX Sen. (O’Rourke v. Cruz)

65%

63%

67%

73%

63%

71%

33%

IN Sen. (Donnelly v. Braun)

68%

80%

67%

67%

50%

100%

nm

AZ Sen. (Sinema v. McSally)

67%

86%

80%

60%

100%

25%

33%

Source = Mei Messaging

nm = not meaningful

In Texas, the pre-election preferences in the Senate race between Beto O’Rourke and Ted Cruz showed a large contrast between young voters (favoring O’Rourke) and older voters (favoring Cruz).  In the Governor’s race, however, the same respondents showed lower variation across age groups and were more balanced between the two parties.  In that race, where respondents were split, it appears voter race and gender were more indicative of voting preference.

PRE-ELECTION POLL

OTHER

Election

WHITE

BLACK

LATINO

N/A

MALE

FEMALE

TX Gov. (Valdez v. Abbott)

32%

83%

69%

53%

43%

72%

FL Gov. (Gillum v. Desantis)

63%

83%

40%

67%

52%

100%

GA Gov. (Abrams v. Kemp)

47%

100%

nm

85%

72%

83%

OH Gov. (Cordray v. DeWine)

57%

100%

0%

65%

59%

73%

TX Sen. (O’Rourke v. Cruz)

49%

92%

71%

67%

58%

83%

IN Sen. (Donnelly v. Braun)

54%

100%

0%

81%

65%

75%

AZ Sen. (Sinema v. McSally)

50%

100%

nm

72%

67%

67%

Source = Mei Messaging

nm = not meaningful

Exit Poll

Voters polled largely voted in the direction they were planning.  Interestingly, the turnout amongst the poll’s predominantly young voters was much lower in Texas (23%) than in other races, likely contributing to the Republican Senate victory.  News sources prior to the election reported youth turnout in early elections was abnormally high, but results suggest that did not last into the regular election.

EXIT POLL

%

AGE GROUP

Election

OVERALL

VOTED

18-21

22-25

26-29

30-34

35-39

40+

TX Gov. (Valdez v. Abbott)

58%

23%

55%

67%

60%

67%

67%

33%

FL Gov. (Gillum v. Desantis)

50%

28%

47%

50%

71%

60%

nm

nm

GA Gov. (Abrams v. Kemp)

80%

43%

60%

100%

100%

nm

nm

50%

OH Gov. (Cordray v. DeWine)

67%

37%

73%

67%

40%

nm

nm

nm

TX Sen. (O’Rourke v. Cruz)

61%

23%

62%

71%

67%

67%

33%

33%

IN Sen. (Donnelly v. Braun)

69%

46%

83%

100%

nm

nm

nm

nm

AZ Sen. (Sinema v. McSally)

53%

40%

80%

40%

nm

nm

nm

nm

Source = Mei Messaging

nm = not meaningful

In the Florida Governor’s race poll, whereas White and Male voters appeared to favor Andrew Gillum(D) in pre-election polls, actually voting favored Ron Desantis (R).  In the Arizona Senate race, actual voting by White and Female respondents turned more against Kyrsten Sinema (D) and in favor of Martha McSally (R) in actual voting.

EXIT POLL

OTHER/

Election

WHITE

BLACK

LATINO

N/A

MALE

FEMALE

TX Gov. (Valdez v. Abbott)

52%

71%

83%

50%

49%

85%

FL Gov. (Gillum v. Desantis)

25%

50%

100%

54%

37%

100%

GA Gov. (Abrams v. Kemp)

63%

86%

100%

89%

80%

80%

OH Gov. (Cordray v. DeWine)

60%

75%

nm

71%

63%

80%

TX Sen. (O’Rourke v. Cruz)

62%

75%

80%

47%

54%

79%

IN Sen. (Donnelly v. Braun)

60%

100%

100%

nm

64%

100%

AZ Sen. (Sinema v. McSally)

29%

100%

nm

67%

67%

20%

Source = Mei Messaging

nm = not meaningful

Lee added, “Thousands of unique opinions and perspectives were represented in this initial test of our new anonymous polling ecosystem, which will soon be available to users of Mei.  With most respondents answering polls in under 30 minutes, we hope to demonstrate that polling via a messaging app can be an effective complement to traditional polling methods.”

About Mei:  Mei is a messaging app with a built-in AI assistant designed to give users personalized intelligence.  The company recently introduced its anonymous polling feature which will enable users to gain personalized intelligence from other users anonymously.  Mei is currently available for Android phones in the Google Play Store.

To find out more about Mei, you can follow them on Instagram or Twitter (@meimessaging) and Facebook (facebook.com/meimessaging).   Mei can be also reached at info@textmei.com and www.textmei.com.

EDITORS NOTE: The featured photo is by rawpixel on Unsplash.

Exit Signs: Poll Warns Dems to Back off Social Issues

In the last 48 hours, there’s been a lot of speculation about what motivated voters to give back control of the House to Democrats. But based on exit polling, we can tell you one thing: it isn’t their radical social policy. Some Americans may be frustrated by GOP leaders or at odds with Donald Trump, but their positions on life, religious liberty, and sexuality are still light years more conservative than the party they just handed half of Congress to.

In a new FRC-commissioned McLaughlin & Associates survey, 1,000 Americans were asked their thoughts on a wide variety of issues — including some that Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has already promised the House will address. The answers we got (which, interestingly, included more people who voted for Democrats on Tuesday than Republicans) might surprise you. When heartland Democrats tried to explain that Hillary Clinton lost because it seemed like she cared “more about bathrooms than jobs,” the party should have listened. Today, those same people are sending the same message – and it’ll be interesting to see if the extremists under Pelosi’s control pay attention.

When they were asked if they approved or disapproved of “government forcing schools, businesses, and nonprofit organizations opening showers, changing facilities, locker rooms, and bathrooms designated for women and girls to biological males and vice versa,” the answer couldn’t be clearer. Sixty percent said they opposed the bathroom policies of Barack Obama and other liberals, compared to just 24 percent who approved. That’s a 36-point gap on an issue that Pelosi has already promised to force on Americans in the new Congress. The Equality Act, the most radical piece of LGBT legislation ever introduced, is about to become a top 10 priority of the Democratic House.

As recently as this year, the Democrats’ own base pleaded with them to stop pushing their transgender agenda and get back to the work of real governing. “You’re killing us” was the headline. “The Democratic brand,” Illinois State Rep. Jerry Costello told Politico, “is hugely damaged, and it’s going to take a while to bring it back. Democrats in southern Illinois have been more identified by [transgender] bathrooms than by putting people back to work.” That seems destined to continue, based on the agenda of House Democrats.

Along those same lines, the majority of people don’t want the federal government to redefine sex to include “gender identity.” That’s especially significant now, as President Trump considers rolling back Obama’s overreach on that very issue. Asked if they wanted to “allow individuals who identify as transgender to get a special legal status related to employment law, federally-funded health care benefits, and the use of bathrooms and showers of the opposite sex,” 54 percent said no. Only 27 percent agree with radical positions of Pelosi and Obama.

On abortion, where Democrats have boxed themselves into one of the most militant positions of all — even going so far as to demand taxpayer-funded abortions in their platform — 56 percent don’t agree. As other polls have shown, the majority of Americans appreciate the Hyde Amendment that Democrats want to abolish – the 41-year-old wall between taxpayers and elective abortion. That’s double the 28 percent in Pelosi’s camp.

But perhaps the most powerful support came on an issue where President Trump stands tallest: religious liberty. A whopping 70 percent of respondents agreed that the government “should leave people free to follow their beliefs about marriage between one man and one woman” — not just in how they live their lives but in how they run their businesses. They’ve seen people like Jack Phillips, Aaron and Melissa Klein, and Barronelle Stuzman personally destroyed for daring to hold a view on marriage that Barack Obama did five years ago. (And, as our poll shows, a plurality still do!) That’s an astounding majority, especially when you see the minuscule number (18 percent) who think like Obama and Pelosi do – that government should be used as a club to beat people into submission on LGBT issues.

The bottom line of the survey is this: if Democrats think they have a mandate to push their fanatical social agenda, they’re wrong. And trust me. In two years, Americans will remind them — like they did in 2010 and 2016 — if they try.


Tony Perkins’ Washington Update is written with the aid of FRC senior writers.


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Justice Was Served by Sessions

Democrats Protest Trump’s Naming Critic of Mueller Probe as Acting Attorney General

With Jeff Sessions’ resignation Wednesday as attorney general, Democrats immediately began attacking his interim replacement.

President Donald Trump tapped Sessions’ chief of staff, Matt Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Iowa, to be acting attorney general.

Sessions, a former Alabama senator and early Trump supporter who angered the president by recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, had been expected to go sometime after the midterm elections Tuesday, if not so soon.

Whitaker, 49, previously ran an ethics watchdog organization called the Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust, or FACT.

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., wasted little time in going after Whitaker in a tweet, referencing an op-ed critical of special counsel Robert Mueller that the acting attorney general wrote before joining the Justice Department.

At the time, Whitaker was a contributor to CNN, paid to give his legal opinions on current events on air and in written commentary.

The CNN op-ed published Aug. 6, 2017, stated that Mueller should not expand the investigation from Russian meddling—the mandate of the investigation—into Trump’s personal finances.

“It does not take a lawyer or even a former federal prosecutor like myself to conclude that investigating Donald Trump’s finances or his family’s finances falls completely outside of the realm of his 2016 campaign and allegations that the campaign coordinated with the Russian government or anyone else,” Whitaker wrote. “That goes beyond the scope of the appointment of the special counsel.”

The previous year, while running the Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust, Whitaker called for the Obama administration to appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server to conduct official business while secretary of state.

After Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation shortly after Trump took office, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein named Mueller to conduct the probe.

Trump repeatedly clashed with Sessions, publicly complaining since last May that he should not have recused himself and blaming him for appointment of a special counsel.

There was nothing inappropriate about Sessions’ expected departure, said Sidney Powell, a former federal prosecutor from Texas who was chief of appellate divisions in two districts.

“The president is entitled to ask the attorney general or any Cabinet member he wants to resign,” Powell told The Daily Signal. “We all saw this coming. This came about 36 hours faster than I expected.”

She noted that because Sessions had recused himself from the Russia probe, it would be impossible to make a credible claim that Trump’s move to push him out was to obstruct an investigation.

“I hope the new AG clearly doesn’t have any conflict of interest and can start doing a lot of things that need to be done such as enforcing immigration laws, reopening the Clinton email investigation, and taking Clorox and a firehose to the Justice Department,” Powell said.

During a press conference Wednesday, shortly before his announcement of Sessions’ departure, Trump said he would not interfere in the special counsel’s investigation.

“I could fire everybody right now, but I don’t want to stop it because politically I don’t like stopping it,” he said. “It’s a disgrace. It should never have been started, because there is no crime.”

Trump announced the replacement of Sessions in a tweet.

In his undated but signed resignation letter to Trump, Sessions wrote: “At your request, I am submitting my resignation.”

The letter goes on to talk about the Justice Department’s crackdown on violent crime and illegal immigration under his watch.

Sessions, 71, left the Justice Department around 5:30 p.m., shaking some hands outside and raising a hand to acknowledge applause from agency employees, including Whitaker, before getting into a car and departing.

Former Attorney General Edwin Meese, who served under President Ronald Reagan, issued a statement praising Sessions’ time at the Justice Department:

Jeff Sessions served his country and the Department of Justice with distinction as the 84th Attorney General of the United States. Although he had a rocky relationship with President Trump, he brought many welcome changes to the Department during his tenure, including a renewed emphasis on fighting violent crime, illegal immigration, and the drug epidemic.

He also brought greater transparency to the Justice Department in a number of areas, ably defended the administration’s legal positions in court, and pursued a more cooperative and productive relationship with state and local law enforcement authorities. He restored integrity to the Justice Department, for which we are grateful.

“I have no doubt that General Sessions will continue to be a passionate and forceful advocate for upholding the rule of law and for the issues that he holds dear,” Meese, the Ronald Reagan distinguished fellow emeritus at The Heritage Foundation, said. “The Heritage Foundation wishes General Sessions well in all of his future endeavors.”

Heritage Foundation President Kay Coles James also had high praise for Sessions.

“Jeff Sessions has dedicated his life to public service as attorney general, senator, and U.S. attorney,” James said in a prepared statement, adding:

I am grateful for his many years of public service and his unwavering fight to preserve liberty in this country. During his time at the Department of Justice, he focused on priorities important to the American people, including strengthening our borders, protecting religious liberty and freedom of speech, and improving public safety. On behalf of The Heritage Foundation, I would like to thank my friend, General Sessions, for his commitment to upholding the rule of law and the Constitution.

But the incoming chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., sounded alarms.

President George W. Bush nominated Whitaker and the Senate confirmed him to serve as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Iowa in 2004.

Whitaker continued to serve in the position through the first 10 months of the Obama administration. He was among federal prosecutors serving on the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

After a stint in the private sector, in October 2014, Whitaker served as the first executive director of the Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust. FACT investigated public corruption, and in early 2016 called for the Obama administration to name a special counsel to look into Clinton’s use of the private email server.

In October 2017, Whitaker left FACT to join the Justice Department as Sessions’ chief of staff.

Whitaker unsuccessfully ran as a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate from Iowa in 2014 and for Iowa state treasurer in 2002. Before going into politics, he was on the football field as a tight end for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes.

COLUMN BY

Portrait of Fred Lucas

Fred Lucas

Fred Lucas is the White House correspondent for The Daily Signal and co-host of “The Right Side of History” podcast. Send an email to Fred. Twitter: @FredLucasWH.


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EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission. Featured photo: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/ Newscom.

6 Big Moments From Trump’s Epic Press Conference on Midterms

President Donald Trump put a positive light on the split results of Tuesday’s midterm election, which saw Democrats win back control of the House even as Republicans made gains in the Senate.

Here are six key moments from Trump’s 86-minute press conference Wednesday, which included some fiery exchanges with reporters.

  1. ‘No Love’ for Vanquished Republicans

The president framed the outcome, in which Republicans increased their Senate majority while losing their House majority, as a “tremendous success.”

Trump compared the results to those under his predecessor, President Barack Obama, who saw Democrats lose 63 House seats and six Senate seats during his first midterm election in 2010.

“I thought it was very close to complete victory,” he said.

“This vigorous campaigning stopped the ‘blue wave’ that they talked about,” Trump said later. “I don’t know if there ever was such a thing, but could have been. If we didn’t do the campaigning, … there could have been. History really will see what a good job we did in the final couple of weeks.”

Trump said House Republicans who lost failed to embrace him during their campaigns. He called out by name Reps. Mike Coffman of Colorado, Mia Love of Utah, Barbara Comstock of Virginia, Carlos Curbelo of Florida, Peter Roskam of Illinois, Erik Paulsen of Minnesota, and John Faso of New York.

He also called out New Jersey’s Republican Senate candidate, Bob Hugin, who lost to Democratic incumbent Bob Menendez.

Of Coffman, Trump said, “Too bad, Mike.”

Regarding Utah’s Love, Trump said: “Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

“Peter Roskam didn’t want the embrace. Erik Paulsen didn’t want the embrace,” Trump said. “I’m not sure I feel happy or sad. But I feel just fine about it.”

“In New Jersey, I think [Hugin] could’ve done well but didn’t turn out too good. Bob Hugin, I feel badly because I think that’s something that could’ve been won, a race that could’ve been won.”

“Those are some of the people that decided for their own reason not to embrace—whether it’s me or what we stand for,” Trump said.

  1. ‘Beautiful’ Deals With Pelosi

Trump said he supports House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., becoming House speaker again, even as many new House Democrats have pledged not to support her.

“If they give her a hard time, perhaps we will add some Republican votes,” Trump said. “She has earned this great honor.”

The president said those who thought he was being sarcastic, in an earlier tweet, about Pelosi deserving the speakership were wrong and that he was sincere.

Trump predicted: “We can do a tremendous amount of great legislation together.”

He also predicted the possibility of a “beautiful, bipartisan type situation” between the White House and House Democrats, and “much less gridlock.”

“Now we have a much easier path because the Democrats will come to us with a plan for infrastructure, a plan for health care, a plan for whatever they’re looking at, and we’ll negotiate,” Trump said.

  1. ‘Solution’ to Abortion Compromise

Trump, who has had a strong pro-life record since becoming president, said the two parties could reach a compromise solution on abortion, which is perhaps the nation’s most polarizing issue.

“I won’t be able to explain that to you, because it is an issue that is a very divisive, polarizing issue,” Trump said.

“But there is a solution. I think I have that solution, and nobody else does. We are going to be working on that.”

  1. ‘Just Sit Down, Please’

CNN correspondent Jim Acosta asked Trump questions about the “caravan” of migrants headed to the U.S.-Mexico border and about the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

After a back and forth, Trump was ready to move on to the next question. When a White House aide went to take the microphone, Acosta clutched it.

This prompted Trump to tell Acosta: “CNN should be ashamed of itself having you working for them. You are a rude, terrible person. You shouldn’t be working for CNN.”

NBC’s Peter Alexander, getting the next question, defended Acosta.

Trump responded: “Well, I’m not a big fan of yours, either.”

Acosta stood up to speak again without a microphone, and Trump said, “Just sit down, please.”

The president added: “When you report fake news, as CNN does a lot, you are an enemy of the people.”

When April Ryan of American Urban Radio, also a CNN contributor, tried to ask a question without being recognized, Trump told her: “Sit down, I didn’t call on you.”

  1. Democrat Investigations Will Be Met With ‘Warlike’ Response

During the election campaign, House Democrats vowed to leap into exhaustive investigations of Trump’s tax returns, his businesses, the Russia matter, and other issues.

Some House Democrats have called for impeaching Trump.

Trump reminded Democrats in the Wednesday press conference that Republicans still hold the Senate.

“They can play that game, but we can play it better, because we have a thing called the United States Senate,” Trump said. “I could see it being extremely good for me politically, because I think I’m better at that game than they are, actually, but we’ll find out.”

Trump added: “If they do that, then it’s just, all it is is a warlike posture.”

  1. Letting Mueller’s Probe Continue

Trump said he won’t interfere in the Russia investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller, vowing that he will “let it go on.”

“I could fire everybody right now, but I don’t want to stop it because politically I don’t like stopping it,” Trump said.

“It’s a disgrace. It should never have been started, because there is no crime.”

COLUMN BY

Portrait of Fred Lucas

Fred Lucas

Fred Lucas is the White House correspondent for The Daily Signal and co-host of “The Right Side of History” podcast. Send an email to Fred. Twitter: @FredLucasWH.

RELATED ARTICLES:

On the Street: Trump Rally Attendees Weigh in on Media Treatment of President

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RELATED VIDEO: Trump press conference following midterm elections. Published on YouTube by CBC News.


The Daily Signal depends on the support of readers like you. Donate now


EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission. Featured photo: Ken Cedeno/UPI/Newscom.

VIDEO: ‘We Know Where You Sleep at Night’: Mob Goes to Home of ‘Racist, Sexist, Bigoted’ Tucker Carlson

A left-wing mob showed up outside Fox News host Tucker Carlson’s house Wednesday evening, posted pictures of his address online, and demanded that he flee the city of Washington, D.C.

ADDED VIDEO: Activist Mob outside of Tucker Carlson’s home. Unbelievable. Published by Vee:

Carlson, a co-founder of The Daily Caller and host of “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” was at the Fox News studio when the angry crowd showed up outside of his house.

At least one of the protesters went all the way up to Carlson’s front door, where they left a sign with his family’s home address written on it and rang his doorbell.

Video of the group, Smash Racism DC, shows one of the mob’s ringleaders leading the crowd in chants of “racist scumbag, leave town!” and “Tucker Carlson, we will fight! We know where you sleep at night!”

“No borders! No walls! No USA at all!” the protesters chanted in another video.

The group posted a picture of the sign with the Carlson family’s address on it to Twitter.

“Tucker Carlson, you cannot hide from the people you hurt with your rhetoric, your lies, and your hate,” the group wrote on Twitter, adding the hashtag “#KnockKnockTucker.”

Twitter removed the tweet with Carlson’s address after an inquiry from The Daily Caller News Foundation.

NBC’s Megyn Kelly denounced the mob tactics toward Carlson.

“This has to stop. Who are we? What are we becoming? @TuckerCarlson is tough & can handle a lot, but he does not deserve this,” Kelly, also a former Fox News host, wrote on Twitter.

“His family does not deserve this. It’s stomach-turning,” Kelly added.

“Smash Racism DC” previously chased Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and his wife out of a restaurant during Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings.

The group later posted a message warning Cruz that he’s “not safe.”

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities for this original content, please email licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

COLUMN BY

Portrait of Peter Hasson

Peter Hasson

Peter J. Hasson is a reporter for The Daily Caller. Twitter: @peterjhasson.

RELATED ARTICLE: Red Alert: Leftists Groups Target Over 900 Cities Tonight. Mobs Forming?

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission. Photo: Christian Monterrosa/Sipa USA/Newscom.

Is Minnesota lost? That has to be the question many are asking this morning.

I woke up this morning with my head spinning about the results nationwide, and couldn’t at first figure out where to dive in to tell you what I think about the midterm election results.

Over time, I’ll have more to say about what it all means, but I do know this—there will be no legislative reform of the US Refugee Admissions Program in the next two years.

Screenshot (1510)

Keith Ellison (right) with U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar

Now that the House is controlled by the Dems, that means that each committee will revert to Democrat control.  And, they will never open for review the Refugee Act of 1980.

Any further reform of the refugee program will have to come from the White House and if I were a betting person, I would bet that they have done about all they will do before 2020 which is to keep the numbers low.

Enough of that, I could be wrong.

As for my friends in Minnesota, don’t get angry at me for asking, but was outgoing governor Dayton right when he famously said in 2015, if you don’t like immigrants find another state?

See my post yesterday on Minnesota.

Here is just one of many stories this morning from Minnesota with Keith Ellison, the state’s new Attorney General saying—-if you mess with Minnesota we will fight back. Which sounds like a veiled threat to silence speech.

From The Minnesota Sun:

Keith Ellison Defeats Doug Wardlow Completing DFL Sweep of Statewide Offices

An emotional Keith Ellison took the stage at St. Paul’s Crowne Plaza hotel late Tuesday night to deliver his victory speech after defeating Republican Doug Wardlow in the race for Minnesota’s Attorney General Office.

The race has been a constant source of controversy on both sides of the aisle, though Republicans were hopeful that Ellison’s past affiliations as well as a domestic-abuse allegation made against him by an ex-girlfriend would keep him from winning the state’s top law-enforcement job.

Polls frequently showed a tight race with large numbers of undecided voters, but Ellison managed to squeak out a victory over Warldow, winning 49 percent of the vote compared to Wardlow’s 44 percent.

Ellison began his victory speech by praising the Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) Party as one based on the “values of love, respect, transparency, and accountability.”

[….]

“We don’t care who it is—if anybody is messing with somebody in Minnesota, your Minnesota attorney general is going to stand up for them and fight back,” he concluded. “Tonight is a good night. Every statewide elected official is a Democrat in Minnesota.”

More here.

Minnesotans, tell me what you think by commenting to this post.  Send me links to other news from the state in the wake of the midterm election.

EDITORS NOTE: The featured image is courtesy of All-Flags-World.com.

PREDICTION: Democrats in the House will overreach on Trump as Democrats in the Senate overreached with Justice Kavanaugh

Kelsey Harkness and Jarrett Stepman in their article “So Much for a ‘Blue Wave’—4 of the Biggest Midterm Takeaways” noted:

“This is not a blue wave,” CNN’s Jake Tapper said while watching early election results come in. What transpired looked more like a blue ripple.

Why?

Harkness and Stepman list the following as one of the key reasons:

2. The Kavanaugh Effect

It was a rough night for red state Senate Democrats who voted against the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., was the only Senate Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh. He narrowly defeated his opponent, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, in a state that President Donald Trump won overwhelmingly in 2016.

But a significant number of Senate Democrats up for election from states that Trump won in 2016 went down in defeat.

Sens. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D.; Joe Donnelly, D-Ind.; Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; and Bill Nelson, D-Fla., all lost to Republican challengers.

According to the Associated Press, the Kavanaugh issue had a particularly big impact in North Dakota.

“[I]n North Dakota, where Republicans picked up a seat that helped them hold onto control of the Senate, voters concerned about Kavanaugh broke toward the GOP by about 2 to 1,” according to AP VoteCast, which is a national survey of the electorate.

Will the Kavanaugh Effect become the Trump Effect in 2010?

Tristan Justice in the article “7 of Pelosi’s Priorities as Democrats Take Back the House” lists:

1. More Investigations of Trump

Democrats will have the power to conduct congressional oversight when they take over the House in January, opening the door to a wide range of investigations of President Donald Trump’s administration.

While some Democrats such as Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., have argued for the impeachment of the president, Pelosi has resisted the idea. As House minority leader, she called the word “impeachment” divisive at a mid-October talk at Harvard’s Institute of Politics, the Associated Press reported.

Instead, Pelosi told students at the gathering that a Democratic majority would use House committees to conduct additional oversight of the Trump administration and preserve all documents related to special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Trump’s connections with Russia, for congressional follow-up.

If House Democrats pillory President Donald J. Trump to the extent that Senate Democrats burned at the stake of public opinion Justice Brett Kavanaugh we may well see serious blow back in 2020.

RELATED ARTICLES:

Look For Democrats To Blow Their Meager Success By Being Jerks

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EDITORS NOTE: The featured photo is by Ian Keefe on Unsplash.

So Much for a ‘Blue Wave’—4 of the Biggest Midterm Takeaways

It wasn’t the blockbuster night Democrats were hoping for.

The blue wave fell far short of some of the major wave elections of the past decade.

In Tuesday’s midterms, Democrats claimed a majority in the House of Representatives for the first time in eight years—but their electoral gains were muted by significant Republican gains in the Senate.

“This is not a blue wave,” CNN’s Jake Tapper said while watching early election results come in. What transpired looked more like a blue ripple.

In the Senate, Republicans solidified their thin majority, with Sen. Ted Cruz  of Texas defending his seat in a high-profile race against Beyoncé-endorsed Rep. Beto O’Rourke. Florida Gov. Rick Scott defeated Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson in one of the most important swing states in the nation, and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley ousted two-term Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, thanks to what many consider the “Kavanaugh effect.”

Historic voting trends suggested Republicans would lose the House. According to Gallup, the president’s party “almost always suffers a net loss” in the House during an off-year election.

While those lost seats will be consequential—producing gridlock and new oversight investigations—historically speaking, the night could have been far worse for the incumbent party in power.

For instance, the first midterm election under President Barack Obama in 2010 was a major electoral defeat for Democrats. Republicans gained 63 seats in the House of Representatives and six seats in the Senate while making significant gains in state houses and gubernatorial elections.

The balance of power shifted Tuesday night, but not as drastically as Democrats had hoped.

1. Historic Campaign Cash Couldn’t Turn Texas Blue

There are some things money can’t buy. The Senate, it appears, is still one of them. Republican Ted Cruz held onto his Senate seat in his hotly contested race against Democrat Beto O’Rourke, who raised a historic amount of campaign cash.

The Center for Responsive Politics estimated the 2018 midterm elections in sum cost a record-breaking $5 billion. Leading in the bank was O’Rourke, who raised an astonishing $70 million. Of that, $53 million came from ActBlue, a nonprofit that enables Democrats to raise money via crowdsourcing.

Overall, the Senate race in Texas cost over $100 million, with Cruz raising another $40 million. Cruz successfully defended his seat, but the race was a nail-biter. With 92 percent of precincts reporting, Cruz had just over 51 percent of the vote, while O’Rourke had 48 percent. That is unusually close for Texas.

While both sides would likely agree that money still matters in midterm elections, it was not the decisive factor in Texas.

2. The Kavanaugh Effect

It was a rough night for red state Senate Democrats who voted against the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., was the only Senate Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh. He narrowly defeated his opponent, West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, in a state that President Donald Trump won overwhelmingly in 2016.

But a significant number of Senate Democrats up for election from states that Trump won in 2016 went down in defeat.

Sens. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D.; Joe Donnelly, D-Ind.; Claire McCaskill, D-Mo.; and Bill Nelson, D-Fla., all lost to Republican challengers.

According to the Associated Press, the Kavanaugh issue had a particularly big impact in North Dakota.

“[I]n North Dakota, where Republicans picked up a seat that helped them hold onto control of the Senate, voters concerned about Kavanaugh broke toward the GOP by about 2 to 1,” according to AP VoteCast, which is a national survey of the electorate.

3. A Bad Night for Prominent Progressive Candidates

A number of young, progressive stars went down in defeat despite receiving significant national attention.

O’Rourke of Texas was the most prominent defeat, but there were others.

Andrew Gillum, who gained notoriety for his stridently progressive views, lost to Rep. Ron Desantis in the Florida governor’s race.

And Stacey Abrams, who received an endorsement from Oprah, trailed Georgia’s secretary of state, Brian Kemp, in the governor’s race, though she vowed to keep pushing for victory in a runoff election.

With Democrats now taking the House for the first time in nearly a decade, staking their fortunes on resistance to Trump, it is now an open question who will become the face of the next generation of progressive leaders.

4. Celebrity Endorsements Didn’t Matter

Pop star Taylor Swift endorsed former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen, a Democrat, for the Senate. He lost. Rihanna endorsed Democrat Andrew Gillum for the Florida governorship. He lost. Oprah, Rihanna, and Sean “Diddy” Combs all endorsed Democrat Stacey Abrams for the Georgia governorship. She lost. Beyoncé endorsed Beto O’Rourke in the Texas race for the Senate. He lost.

Suffice it to say, celebrity endorsements were one of the biggest losers of the midterms.

It appears Americans like Hollywood’s music, movies, and TV shows, but not their politics. Celebrity endorsements didn’t push candidates over the finish line. If anything, they may have done the opposite—urged the “forgotten” people to show up.

COLUMN BY

Portrait of Kelsey Harkness

Kelsey Harkness

Kelsey Harkness is a senior news producer at The Daily Signal and co-host of “Problematic Women,” a podcast and Facebook Live show. Send an email to Kelsey. Twitter: @kelseyjharkness.

Portrait of Jarrett Stepman

Jarrett Stepman

Jarrett Stepman is an editor and commentary writer for The Daily Signal and co-host of “The Right Side of History” podcast. Send an email to Jarrett. Twitter: @JarrettStepman.

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Podcast: Divided Government Is Back


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EDITORS NOTE: This column with images is republished with permission.

Florida Goes Red: Governor Ron DeSantis and Senator Rick Scott

The results are in for the State of Florida. Here are the results for the race for the Governorship and the U.S. Senate in the sunshine state.

Ballotpedia Governor Race:

Former U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis (R) defeated Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D) and four others in the general election on November 6, 2018, for Florida‘s governorship. Businessman Chris King (D) was Gillum’s running mate. State Rep. Jeanette Nuñez (R) was DeSantis’ running mate.

Governor – General Nov. 07, 2018 04:34 ET

Party Name Votes Vote %
GOP

DeSantis, Ron

4,046,020
49.75 %
Dem
Gillum, Andrew
3,986,596
49.02 %
RP
Richardson, Darcy
46,629
0.57 %
NPA
Gibson, Kyle
24,171
0.30 %
NPA
Stanley, Bruce
14,433
0.18 %
NPA
Foley, Ryan
14,401
0.18 %

BREAKING NEW VIDEO: Electioneering in New Jersey & Ohio Exposed

Project Veritas has released undercover video exposing New Jersey election officials suggesting people vote for Democrats, which is illegal.

Click here to see the video.

Ohio: Project Veritas Action has released another undercover video, this time exposing an election official encouraging voting for Sherrod Brown.

Click here to see the video.

RELATED ARTICLES:

FBI seeks info on woman identified as Democratic volunteer after Georgia voter system attacked – True Pundit

San Francisco Registers 49 Noncitizen Voters—at a Cost of More Than $6,300 Each

EDITORS NOTE: These videos and images are republished with permission.