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24 People Have Died Since Violence Erupted Following George Floyd’s Death

During two months of protests and rioting over the death of George Floyd, 24 people have been killed.

Most recently, protests and riots in Portland have escalated in violence, with attacks directed at the courthouse and fires being lit, with officers responding by using tear gas and pepper bullets along with other crown control munitions.

Many cities are reporting crime surges, including Minneapolis, which is experiencing an increase in gun violence in the area where Floyd died.

These are the people who’ve died as of July 30.

David Dorn, 77, died June 2 while trying to protect Lee’s Pawn Jewelry from looters. He served 38 years at the St. Louis Police Department before retiring. He died in the middle of a street after being shot in the torso by suspected rioters, according to the police incident report. The slaying was caught on Facebook Live, according to the St.Louis Dispatch.

Barry Perkins, 29, died after getting stuck on the converter dolly between a FedEx truck’s trailers while the driver of the truck pulled away. The driver, who was rerouted because of the protests, said he didn’t know the man was there. People began “removing items” from the truck and two men standing on the passenger side showed the driver they had guns, so the driver feared for his life, honked the horn and started driving until he was stopped by police. By the time police stopped the truck, Perkins had gotten caught by the trailer tire and was run over, according to KSDK.

David McAtee, 53, the owner of a barbecue restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, was killed June 1 after police and National Guard members opened fire at a protest. The National Guard was sent to disperse a crowd and said they were shot at, which prompted them to return fire. McAtee’s sister told WAVE 3 News that the crowd gathered at the scene of the shooting did not relate to the protests, and was there meeting at his restaurant.

Dorian Murrell, 18, was shot and killed May 31 by Tyler Newby, 29, in Indianapolis. Newby and his friend told police that they were walking around Downtown after the protests, found a gas canister on the ground and picked it up. They said after doing so, they were approached by a group of about 10 males who asked them what they found. Newby said he was pushed to the ground, pulled out his gun and shot the person standing over him. Murrell’s family member at the scene said there was no physical altercation, according to Indy Star.

Marquis M. Tousant, 23, was shot and killed June 1in Davenport, Iowa after police responded to reports of a suspicious vehicle, before their car was fired upon multiple times, according to WQAD. Police found a semi-automatic handgun underneath Tousant’s body and multiple shell casings surrounding his body. Tousant was also seen on video with a gun at a shooting outside a jewelry store that night. It’s unclear whose weapon fired the shot that killed him, according to QC Times.

Calvin L. Horton Jr., 43, was fatally shot near the police department’s Third Precinct in Minneapolis in what is believed to be the first killing since the protests began according to Minnesota’s CBS affiliate.

James Scurlock, 22, was fatally shot by a bar owner during a fight with several people May 30 in Omaha, Nebraska, amid protests, according to Buzzfeed News. Charges weren’t brought against the shooter, Jake Gardner, who was determined to have acted in self-defense. Gardner’s father had pushed several protesters when asking them to leave the bar.

Victor Cazares, 27, was shot and killed in Chicago during rioting, which was ruled a homicide by the Cook County medical examiner’s office. The town spokesperson said the shootings were caused by “outside agitators who were driving through Cicero seeking to cause trouble,” according to the Chicago Sun Times.

Patrick Underwood, 53, was an officer in the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Protective Service who was gunned down May 29 as he stood guard outside the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Oakland, Calif. amid protesting.  A second federal officer was shot with him but was not killed. Oakland police chief said the shooting was most likely deliberately targeting uniformed officers, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Jorge Gomez, 25, was shot and killed by Las Vegas police during June 1 protests near the federal courthouse in downtown Las Vegas. Gomez was wearing body armor and armed with three weapons during the protests, and raised his weapon toward officers, LVMPD said according to News 3 Las Vegas.

Tyler Gerth, 27, was allegedly shot and killed by Steven Lopez, 23, a frequent participant in the protests in Louisville. Lopez allegedly shot into the crowd at a protest and killed Gerth, who was a vocal supporter of the protests, according to USA Today.

Summer Taylor, 24, was killed by a man who drove his car into a closed Seattle freeway into a crowd of protesters July 4.

Robert Forbes, 55, died June 6 after being struck by a car while protesting in California City.

Jose Gutierrez, 28, was an innocent bystander allegedly killed by Zion Haygood, who was involved in the widespread looting that was taking place in Chicago and the surrounding suburbs.

John Tiggs, 32, was shot and killed in Chicago while walking into a Metro PCS May 31 to pay a bill during widespread looting. Someone in the store opened fire, killing Tiggs.

Marvin Francois, 50, was shot and killed May 31 while picking up one of his sons from a protest when 3 carjackers tried to steal his car in Kansas City.

Antonio Mays Jr., 16, was shot and killed in a shooting near the Seattle Capitol Hill Organized Protest (CHOP) June 30. Mays was shot after driving his Jeep Cherokee near the barriers of the CHOP, where witnesses said they saw several people begin to fire into the vehicle, according to the NY Post.

Secoriea Turner, 8-year-old girl: Turner was shot and killed on the Fourth of July after at least two people in a crowd opened fire on the car she was in with her mother and her mother’s friend near the Wendy’s where Rayshard Brooks was killed and became a site of protest in Atlanta.

Garrett Foster, 28, shot and killed July 25 in downtown Austin after allegedly approaching a car that turned onto a street where protesters were gathered while holding an assault rifle. The driver fired multiple shots out of his window after Foster pointed the rifle at him, according to Austin Police Chief Brian Manley.

Not yet named: 29-year-old Chicago man was shot and killed in what was ruled a homicide and attributed to “outside agitators” during the riots.

Not yet named: Unidentified male in his 20s was shot and killed by the owner of a gun store in Philadelphia while trying to loot his store.

Not yet namedPhiladelphia man tried to blow up an ATM to loot it and was killed, according to a CBS Philadelphia affiliate.

Not yet named: Detroit man was shot and killed during protests, and police are searching for a woman identified as a person of interest.

To collate this list, the Daily Caller searched public news reports of deaths that occurred following the eruption of violence during protests, which included shootings and looting that were linked to mass unrest.

COLUMN BY

MARLO SAFI

Culture reporter.

RELATED ARTICLES:

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School Social Worker, Physical Therapist Charged With Assaulting Wisconsin State Senator During Protest

Authorities Seize IEDs In Seattle — DHS Also Confirms Their Use In Portland Protests

‘That’s A Myth’: Democrats Downplay The Violence In Portland

‘I Was Stabbed For Being A Conservative Journalist’: Videographer Injured At Portland Protests

Federal Agents Set To Deploy In Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee To Curb Rising Crime

EDITORS NOTE: This Daily Caller column is republished with permission. ©All rights reserved.

The Ex-Im Bank Is Dead — But Watch Out for Corporate Welfare Zombies by Daniel J. Ikenson

At midnight, the gears of crony capitalism ground to a halt at 811 Vermont Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C.

After 81 years of funneling taxpayer dollars to favored companies, projects, and geopolitical outcomes under the guise of advancing some vague conception of the “U.S. economic interest,” the Export-Import Bank of the United States will end its financing operations at midnight tonight.

No more subsidies to Fortune 100 businesses. No more siphoning revenues from unwitting U.S. firms and industries. No more loan guarantees to wealthy, autocratic foreign governments. No more crowding out of private lending. No more taxpayer exposure to a Fannie Mae-like fiasco. No more bribery and corruption scandals. No more collaboration and lending to China’s Export-Import Bank – you know, the entity whose support for Chinese companies is alleged to threaten U.S. exporters and jobs, and is the most frequently cited imperative for reauthorizing Ex-Im.

No more of any of this… for now.

Champions of small government and market capitalism should savor this rare victory. It was won with solid arguments, including over 20 years of analyses from Cato Institute scholars including Ian Vasquez, Aaron Lukas, Steve Slivinsky, Chris Edwards, Doug Bandow, Sallie James, and – perhaps most comprehensively and tirelessly – Veronique de Rugy.

It was won because of columnist/scholar Tim Carney’s persistence in focusing the public’s attention on the corruption bred of corporate welfare and because of the analytical contributions of Heritage’s Diane Katz, the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Ryan Young, and others who continued to make compelling arguments for shuttering the Bank, despite steep odds against that outcome.

It was won because certain libertarian groups and conservative activists made the issue a priority, recognizing that corporate welfare is as great a threat to liberty as is the Welfare State, and that reining it in should be a priority because success there would lend greater credibility to the effort to rein in the Welfare State.

It was won against great odds, including vast political expenditures and arm-twisting by U.S. business interests on Capitol Hill, a mainstream media that is reflexively unsympathetic to any cause associated with “Tea Party Types,” and a general aversion among establishment organizations to any challenges to the status-quo.

Radical and reckless, excessive and extreme, ideological and idiotic have been the characterizations assigned by media, politicians, and Boeing lobbyists in their attempts to discredit legitimate efforts to purge “crony” and make “market” the new brand of capitalism.

And it was won because House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling and Senate Banking Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, knowing the case against Ex-Im reauthorization was more substantive than the New York Times would allow, made good gatekeepers by putting the onus on Ex-Im proponents to answer the critics – a task at which they failed.

So, at midnight, the Export-Import Bank ceased in its capacity to issue new financing. That is something to cheer. It may also be short-lived.

Proponents of the Bank have been regrouping and strategizing to move legislation to reauthorize the Bank at the soonest possible chance. In fact the White House is hosting a conference call for the purpose of advancing that outcome. Here’s the text of the email:

Dear Friend,

Please join us for a conference call on Tuesday, June 30th, at 2:35 PM with President Barack Obama, Senior Advisor to the President, Valerie Jarrett, and Director of the National Economic Council, Jeff Zients, to discuss the importance of reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank of the United States.

The Export-Import Bank is a critical tool to help U.S. businesses and workers succeed in global markets and grow their exports – it supports high-quality jobs, is a vital tool for small businesses, and doesn’t cost taxpayers a penny. Its reauthorization is vital to U.S. competitiveness and leveling the playing field for American small business owners and workers. …

This call is off the record and is not for press purposes nor amplification on social media.

Thank you,

The White House Business Council

The battle may be over but the war continues. Given the sway that conservatives have had on this issue, it will be interesting to see whether and how Speaker Boehner tries to circumvent Hensarling’s committee to get a reauthorization bill to the floor. Majority Leader McConnell believes there’s enough support in the Senate for reauthorization, but most of the Republican presidential hopefuls have expressed opposition to reauthorization.

It seems to me that if Ex-Im reauthorization resurfaces in the weeks and months ahead, it will be an issue that provides Republicans with yet another opportunity to demonstrate commitment to limited government, free market principles. Maybe this time they’ll see the value in reclaiming that brand.


Daniel Ikenson

Dan Ikenson is director of Cato’s Herbert A. Stiefel Center for Trade Policy Studies, where he coordinates and conducts research on all manners of international trade and investment policy.

EDITORS NOTE: A version of this post first appeared at Cato.org.