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TwitRage: Black Lives Matter demands police not drink Pepsi — Coca-Cola reponds

A Pepsi Cola ad featuring Kendall Jenner, a fashion model known for appearing in the E! reality television show Keeping Up with the Kardashians, was withdrawn after Black Lives Matter (BLM), OurStates.org, Organizing for Action and various supporters of the neo-Democrat party took to Twitter to denounce this anti-social justice, racist, bigoted, misogynistic advertisement.

Here is the now banned, by BLM and the Democratic National Committee, Pepsi ad:

Judy Kurtz and Mark Hensch from The Hill report:

Pepsi is reportedly pulling the plug on a sharply criticized new ad featuring Kendall Jenner ending a street protest by handing a can of soda to a police officer.

[ … ]

Jenner then approaches a police officer standing guard at the protest and hands him a Pepsi. The crowd erupts in cheers as the officer smiles and takes a sip of the soft drink.

[ … ]
Top Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson said before Pepsi’s reversal Wednesday that the spot demeans social justice activists.

“The video in so many ways is offensive to all the people who’ve stood in the street for the past two years against police brutality and fighting injustice that the state has caused,” he told TMZ.

Here are a few examples of the TwitRage:

deray mckessonBLM activist  tweeted, “., this ad is trash.”

 tweeted, “The Kendall Jenner Pepsi fiasco is a perfect example of what happens when there’s no black people in the room when decisions are being made.”

, “i couldn’t make it through the whole thing. poc [people of color] being used as props, a rich celebrity solving social justice issues with soda…Cringe.”

, “particularly a celeb from a family famous for cultural appropriation. It’s like the cherry on this shit pie”

Pepsi Cola released an apology following the TwitRage:

man with ak47After reviewing our ad we realized that we did not properly portray the prototypical social justice activist (SJA).

Our staff is working on a new add that has the SJAs dressed in black hoodies, wearing masks and hurling Molotov cocktails made from Pepsi bottles at the police.

We will have Kendall at the end of our new commercial shoot a police officer using a zip-gun made from a Pepsi Cola can. The officer will slowly die drowning in his own blood while the social justice protesters cheer, to show our commitment to the latest millennial revolution! Fifty shades of red.

Pepsist! Pepsist! Pepsist!

Coca-Cola in a press release noted:

It appears that Pepsi has fallen on its own soda container. They tried to identify with those who are burning cars, attacking the police and destroying Starbucks coffee shops. The result TwitRage!

Darren-Lago-Coca-Cola-GunCoca-Cola will be doing a series of ads that will draw in ‘fly-over’ Americans. We are interested in those who voted for law and order, equal justice under the law and respect for one another. We will be offering a special Coca-Cola Colt Peacemaker (pictured).

Our new commercials will be branded Make Coke Great Again-Cola or MCGA-Cola.  We will be featuring in our new series of commercials using law enforcement officers, Navy SEALs, U.S. Army Rangers and Green Berets protecting innocents from those who would do them harm, like those in the Pepsi ad.

Appearing on our MCGA-Cola cans will be photographs of the 37 Hollywood stars who support President Donald J. Trump.

MCGA-Cola will begin shipping next month to local stores. #MAGA with #MCGA-Cola!

Let the cola wars begin!

RELATED ARTICLES:

Ferguson, Missouri Elects White Mayor – NBC News

Pepsi pulls widely mocked Kendall Jenner ad | TheHill

Stanford Accepts Muslim Teenager Who Wrote ‘BlackLivesMatter’ 100 Times On Application

EDITORS NOTE: This political satire originally appeared in Soldier of Fortune magazine.

Social Justice Warriors Target “Big Soda”

A recent attack on “Big Soda” – Michael Bloomberg’s other cause célèbre – at last week’s Berkshire Hathaway shareholder meeting revealed the lengths to which Social Justice Warriors will go to impose their will on consumers and lawful businesses.

Berkshire Hathaway, under the direction of famed investor Warren Buffett, is one of the most successful companies in American history.  Among its most profitable investments is a 9% share in Coca-Cola – making it the largest single corporate shareholder in the company.

For the second year in a row, anti-soda activists challenged Warren Buffett over the morality of this investment. In 2015, hedge fund manager Bill Ackman declared that Buffett’s investment in Coca-Cola was “immoral” because soda consumption is linked to obesity and other health problems.

This year, journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin cited a Tufts University study that stated sugary drinks – like Coca-Cola – caused 180,000 deaths a year from diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.  “Please explain directly why we Berkshire Hathaway shareholders should be proud to own Coke,” Sorkin demanded.

Fortunately, Warren Buffett – who drinks an average of five cans of Cherry Coke a day – brought the room back to reality by reminding the audience that people have the liberty to make their own decisions.  “You have a choice,” he said. “I make a choice to get 700 calories from Coke, I like fudge a lot, too, and peanut brittle and I am a very happy guy.”  He went on, “I’ve not seen evidence that convinces me I’ll be more likely to make it to 100 if I suddenly switched to water and broccoli.”

This divestment campaign follows the same game plan that New York Mayor Bill de Blasio,  Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel and Bloomberg-supported States United to Prevent Gun Violence have used to strong-arm pension plans into dumping shares in firearm companies.

These are the lengths to which authoritarian-minded activists will go control your lives and scapegoat legal businesses.  They will never stop trying to dictate whatever they believe is good for you, and they are so convinced of their self-righteousness that they will never question the validity of their beliefs.  Indeed, it is exactly these sorts of crusading zealots that prompted the writer C.S. Lewis’ to caution that “a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive,” because “those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end.”

Do Corporations Run the Market? Do companies control consumers?

One this day in 1985, the Coca-Cola Company introduced “New Coke” to replace its flagship soft drink Coca-Cola. Their executives were so sure that they knew what consumers wanted, they pulled the old formula from the shelves entirely.

The new product — or, rather, the new product combined with the loss of the old familiar one — generated so much negative response that the company put “Classic Coke” back on the market less than 3 months later.

As Vox notes, however, the company hadn’t been stupid or reckless. Coke had been losing market share to the sweeter-tasting Pepsi for years, and they needed to shake things up.

They conducted countless hours of consumer research, performing over 200,000 blind taste tests between Classic Coke, New Coke, and Pepsi — and New Coke swept the field.

Moreover, in their judgment, Coke had to be replaced with a better product — the company couldn’t simply add an additional flavor:

It didn’t have a choice — Coke needed to retain market share for a single drink.

Fountain sales made up a formidable two-thirds of Coke’s market. . . . Many of the contracts depended on Coke being the top-ranked cola. And if market share for Coca-Cola fell, the company might lose even more ground to Pepsi. If Coke had planned to run New Coke and original Coke side by side, it would have risked splitting its market share and alienating valuable fountain clients.

The smartest guys in the room all knew what the market needed. They pulled the trigger on New Coke, lost millions of dollars, and became a punchline for decades.

A line from Ludwig von Mises’s Human Action is informative: “The entrepreneur in his entrepreneurial capacity is always subject to the full supremacy of the consumers.”

In Bureaucracy, Mises elaborated:

The capitalists … are instrumental in the conduct of economic affairs. They are at the helm and steer the ship. But they are not free to shape its course. They are not supreme, they are steersmen only, bound to obey unconditionally the captain’s orders. The captain is the consumer. . . .

The real bosses are the consumers. They, by their buying and by their abstention from buying, decide who should own the capital and run the plants. They determine what should be produced and in what quantity and quality.

It was a lesson that Coke learned the hard way. In free markets, even the biggest, most entrenched corporations must follow the orders of the consumers. Icebergs await those who flout their preferences.

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