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ANALYSIS: Biden’s Vaccine Mandate Hurts Working Class America The Most

  • President Joe Biden’s executive action requiring most U.S. workers to get vaccinated hurts working class Americans the most, according to polling and vaccination data.
  • “Unfortunately, this disproportionately harms people of lower socioeconomic groups,” Jeffrey Singer, a health policy expert at the Cato Institute, told the Daily Caller News Foundation when asked about Biden’s vaccine mandate. “A significant number of people who don’t want to get vaccinated are mainly of lower socioeconomic status.”
  • Just 66% of U.S. adults with less than a college degree have been vaccinated, significantly fewer than the 76% of total adults who have received a vaccination, according to a Sept. 10-13 Morning Consult poll.

President Joe Biden’s executive action requiring most U.S. workers to get vaccinated hurts working class Americans the most, according to polling and vaccination data.

Americans with lower levels of education are less likely to get and be more hesitant about COVID-19 vaccinations, according to survey data from the Census Bureau. Separate polling data showed that those Americans are also more likely to oppose vaccine mandates including Biden’s recent order requiring the jab for millions of workers.

“Unfortunately, this disproportionately harms people of lower socioeconomic groups,” Jeffrey Singer, a health policy expert at the Cato Institute, told the Daily Caller News Foundation when asked about Biden’s vaccine mandate. “A significant number of people who don’t want to get vaccinated are mainly of lower socioeconomic status.”

“At this point, I think it runs the risk of doing more harm than good,” Singer added.

Just 66% of U.S. adults with less than a college degree have been vaccinated, fewer than the 76% of total adults who have received a vaccination, according to a Sept. 10-13 Morning Consult poll. Meanwhile, 84% and 88% of adults with a bachelor’s degree and graduate degree respectively have been vaccinated.

About 11% of adults with some college education or an associate degree, 14% of adults with a high school diploma and 14.6% of those with less than a high school diploma reported being hesitant to get vaccinated, the Census Bureau Household Pulse Survey found. By comparison, 5% of those with at least a bachelor’s degree are hesitant.

Biden ordered the Department of Labor last week to issue a rule forcing businesses with 100 or more employees to mandate vaccinations at their workplace. The order, which applies to more than 81.1 million Americans, allows workers to choose to submit weekly tests to their employer instead of getting vaccinated.

The White House hasn’t clarified if private sector workers who choose not to be vaccinated will be expected to pay for the weekly tests. Some experts have predicted that employers will be allowed to choose whether to pay for the tests or not, The New York Times reported.

The Labor Department didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment on how weekly tests will be paid for.

Biden’s vaccine mandate for private sector workers doesn’t apply to those who work from home, according to the Miami Herald.

The president also issued executive orders requiring federal employees and contractors to be fully vaccinated by Nov. 22, 2021, the White House said. There are an estimated 4.2 million full-time federal employees, according to the Congressional Research Service.

“Many of us are frustrated with the nearly 80 million Americans who are still not vaccinated, even though the vaccine is safe, effective, and free,” Biden said during Sept. 9 remarks at the White House.

“We’ve been patient, but our patience is wearing thin,” he added later in his speech.

Thirty-six percent of Americans with less than a college degree said they opposed Biden’s rule forcing private sector employees to get vaccinated, the recent Morning Consult poll showed. Those with a Bachelor’s degree and those with a graduate degree opposed it at a rate of 29% and 23% respectively.

On the question of vaccine mandates more broadly, 43% of adults with less than a college degree agreed that mandates violate the rights of Americans, according to the poll. Thirty-one percent of adults with a Bachelor’s degree and 25% with a graduate degree agreed.

Labor unions and trade groups representing working class Americans have come out in opposition to Biden’s vaccine mandate.

“These proposed requirements—however well-intentioned—threaten to cause further disruptions throughout the supply chain, impeding our nation’s COVID response efforts and putting the brakes on any economic revival,” American Trucking Associations President and CEO Chris Spear said in a statement.

“If these mandates are designed to protect Americans, then why the discriminatory 100-employee threshold, picking winners and losers for both employees and employers?” he continued.

COLUMN BY

Thomas Catenacci

Reporter

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Busting Myths about Income Inequality by Chelsea German

Politicians speak often about income inequality. But that doesn’t mean they are well-informed. Indeed, they propagate four myths about the issue.

  1. Most often, those vying for elected office describe income inequality as static — as though the people who make up each income group do not change.
    The “top 1 percent” or the “top 10 percent” of income-earners are portrayed as exclusive clubs that seldom accept new members or see old and current members leave. No fluidity, no change.
  2. Political figures also have a tendency only to blame income inequality on factors like trade, immigration, an insufficiently high minimum wage, inadequate taxes on the wealthy, or the vague concept of “greed.”
  3. They typically ignore the sizeable role of choices under an individual’s control.
  4. They downplay the role of regressive government regulations.

Reality is much more interesting than soundbites.

Americans often move between different income brackets over the course of their lives. Indeed, over 50 percent of Americans find themselves among the top 10 percent of income-earners for at least one year during their working lives, and over 11 percent of Americans will be counted among the top 1 percent of income-earners for at least one year.

Fortunately, a great deal of what explains this income mobility are choices that are largely within an individual’s control. While people tend to earn more in their “prime earning years” than in their youth or old age, other key factors that explain income differences are education level, marital status, and number of earners per household. As AEI’s Mark Perry recently wrote:

The good news is that the key demographic factors that explain differences in household income are not fixed over our lifetimes and are largely under our control (e.g. staying in school and graduating, getting and staying married, etc.), which means that individuals and households are not destined to remain in a single income quintile forever.

According to the U.S. economist Thomas Sowell, whom Perry cites, “Most working Americans, who were initially in the bottom 20 percent of income-earners, rise out of that bottom 20 percent. More of them end up in the top 20 percent than remain in the bottom 20 percent.”

While people move between income groups over their lifetime, many worry that income inequality between different income groups is increasing. The growing income inequality is real, but its causes are more complex than the demagogues make them out to be.

Consider, for example, the effect of “power couples,” or people with high levels of education marrying one another and forming dual-earner households. In a free society, people can marry whoever they want, even if it does contribute to widening income disparities.

Or consider the effects of regressive government regulations on exacerbating income inequality. These include barriers to entry that protect incumbent businesses and stifle competition. To name one extreme example, Louisiana recently required a government-issued license to become a florist. Lifting more of these regressive regulations would aid income mobility and help to reduce income inequality, while also furthering economic growth.

If our elections were more about the substance of serious public policy issues, rather than demagoguery and soundbites, achieving reasonable solutions could move from the land of make-believe to our complex, dynamic reality.

This article first appeared at CapX.

Chelsea GermanChelsea German

Chelsea German works at the Cato Institute as a Researcher and Managing Editor of HumanProgress.org.

Welfare benefits causing Muslim migration to Europe and U.S.

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Click on the image for a printable copy of the policy analysis.

The CATO Institute’s Michael D. Tanner and Charles Hughes in their comprehensive policy analysis titled “The Work versus Welfare Trade-Off: Europe” report:

If welfare benefits become too generous, they can create a significant incentive that encourages recipients to remain “on the dole” rather than to seek employment. Benefits in European Union (EU) countries vary widely, but in many of them, benefits are high relative to what an individual could expect to earn from a low-wage or entry-level job. For example, for a single parent with two children in 2013—

  • Welfare benefits in nine EU countries exceeded €15,000 ($18,200) per year. In six countries, benefits exceeded €20,000 ($24,300). Denmark offers the most generous benefit package, valued at €31,709 ($38,558).
  • In nine countries, welfare benefits exceeded the minimum wage in that country.
  • Benefits in 11 countries exceeded half of the net income for someone earning the average wage in that country, and in 6 countries it exceeded 60 percent of the net average wage income.
  • In Austria, Croatia, and Denmark, the effective marginal tax rate for someone leaving welfare for work was nearly 100 percent, meaning that a person would gain virtually no additional income from working. In another 16 countries, individuals would face an effective marginal tax rate in excess of 50 percent.
  • Benefits in the United States fit comfortably into the mainstream of welfare states. Excluding Medicaid, the United States would rank 10th among the EU nations analyzed, more generous than France and slightly less generous than Sweden. Thirty-five states offer a package more generous than the mean benefit package offered in the European countries analyzed.

Many European countries have recognized the problem and have begun to reform their welfare systems to create a better transition from welfare to work. In fact, the United States is falling behind some European countries with regard to welfare reform.

Countries that are serious about reducing welfare dependency and rewarding work should consider strengthening work requirements, establishing time limits for participation, and tightening eligibility. Perhaps more important, countries should examine the level of benefits available and the effective marginal tax rates their welfare systems create, with an eye toward reducing disincentives and encouraging work.

Read the full policy analysis buy clicking here.

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